Fake Social Media Profiles: What to do if You are Being Impersonated Online

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Impersonation on social media is rampant; whether you know someone who have received a message from a fake profile, or you have found your own identity personated on some platform online, it seems that there are precious few degrees between individuals and fake accounts.

When account setup is as easy as inputting a name and email, it’s no wonder that these false accounts are everywhere. And they will continue to be created, unless social platforms integrate stricter terms for signing up.

For now, all of the bots/impersonators of the world can continue to thrive in account creation as easy as 1-2-3.

Insta1Good enough for Instagram.

So, what can you do to prevent this from happening in the first place? The short answer is, unfortunately, nothing. But you can address the issue after these fake accounts have been identified, and it is important to do so. At best, impersonators may be a minor nuisance. At worst, they could damage your online brand.

Fortunately, most popular social networks have processes to report false profiles. Without further ado, here is how you can take action.

Facebook

If you see a profile impersonating you or someone you know, here are the steps you can take to address it.

Navigate to the fake profile, and on the lower right corner of the cover photo, there should be a symbol that looks like facebook dots.PNG .  If you select this, a drop-down menu will appear, from which you can select ‘Report’ and follow the onscreen instructions.

If you do not have a Facebook account and wish to report a fake profile in your name, you can do so by filling out this form.

LinkedIn 

The process for reporting a fake profile on LinkedIn is very similar to that of Facebook. Like Facebook, LinkedIn has the three-dots symbol on its profiles that will enable you to select the option to Report/Block. Then, in the reporting pop-up window, you’ll be able to detail the impersonation under “What do you want to do?” > “Tell us a little more”.

Twitter

Twitter’s policy is complex because it does allow parody accounts so long as they clearly state that they are not the individual that they are parodying, however, you can still take action against fake profiles in your name by filling out this form.

Instagram 

You can report fake profiles on Instagram either within the app or by filling out a separate form, which will require you to provide a piece of government issued photo ID, such as your driver’s license or passport.

Finally, after going through the reporting process for the false profile, be sure to let your friends and followers know that this impersonator account is not real and that they should not click on any links coming from it.

This article was written by Kristina Weber of Centry. For more content like this, be sure to subscribe to Centry Blog for weekly articles and follow us on Twitter @CentryLTD!

What to Pack in a Grab-Bag

One of the ways that you can prepare yourself for an emergency is to stock a grab-bag. That is, a bag containing a handful of supplies that could make all the difference in recovering after an emergency, whether it’s a natural disaster or hostile threat.  The idea is that you need only to take this single bag with you as you respond to a crisis, ensuring that you have what you need for immediate survival following the contingency.

The exact necessities that you pack will be impacted by your geographical location and the regional-specific risks therein, but here are a few ideas to get you started:

Information & Documentation

This should include your passport and/or visa, and any other important documents related to your identity. This is especially important if you are travelling abroad, particularly if the contingency requires you to leave the country. Even if it is for a home-emergency, being able to have at least a couple identifying documents will assist you in the recovery of other important documents after the fact.

Food & Water

A stock of high energy, non-perishable food items and as much water as you can feasibly carry.

Communications

A spare mobile phone with a charger.

Health & Safety

Basic first aid kit and any essential medications that you may require day-to-day.

Other

Some other items to include in your grab bag are money, a change of clothing, candles, matches, a flashlight/torch, and spare batteries.

Keep in mind that the general advised contents of this grab bag address the needs of the average individual whether they are at home or traveling. Family and/or group kits will vary, especially if there are pets involved. 

If you have any questions or would like expanded detail of this, please don’t hesitate to contact us at info@centry.global! Remember to subscribe for weekly updates on Centry Blog, and follow us on Twitter @CentryLTD for more content like this.

Social Networks & Data Protection Policies

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In preparation for GDPR, a comprehensive EU data protection law, a few big-name social media companies have taken the time to review their privacy policies, making it easier for users to know where and how their information is being used.

Facebook has made some changes to its privacy settings in light of the Cambridge Analytica scandal and Mr. Zuckerberg’s congressional hearings. While it is not changing the information that the company collects from its users, it is making strides toward greater transparency on what that information is and how that is shared. It created a central hub with a more user-friendly interface to enable people to more easily see what data they are sharing and who can see it.

Additionally, the social network will make it easier for users to see all the data that the company has on them – previously, this could be accessed by a massive data dump download, however the new Access Your Information tool allows individuals to explore the information by category.

Twitter updated their privacy policy, sending out emails to their users with information on some of their key revisions. These include more focus on the controls that they offer users over their personal data, more focus on how Twitter shares public data, more transparency and control over how the data is shared with business partners. Furthermore, there is more clarity about how data may be shared to prevent harm, comply with the law, or serve public interest.

LinkedIn has adapted its policy to enable members to download their personal data, and it has followed up on GDPR’s right to erasure, by clarifying that personal data such as audience email addresses will be automatically deleted within a 90 day time frame if it is not edited or being used in active campaigns.

If you are active on any social media networks, be sure to take a proactive approach and review your privacy settings, as well as the availability of your personal data.

This article was written by Kristina Weber at Centry Ltd. For more content like this, subscribe to Centry Blog and follow us on Twitter @CentryLTD!

GDPR & Consent

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The deadline for compliance with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is approaching fast: May 25th, 2018 is when enforcement will begin.

Be sure to read Centry’s GDPR Guide for a concise, easy-to-read breakdown of what GDPR is and important details of what you need to know about it.

For any questions or comments, feel free to contact us at info@centry.global or on any of our social media outlets. We’re here to help you!

 

4 Social Media Risks to Businesses

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Over the years, social media has evolved into a critical marketing and customer relations tool for businesses. Between audience-targeted ads and personal engagement, social media can be unparalleled in bringing organizations closer to their customers and clients. 

What about the Risks?

In this post, we’ll address some of the most common risks that businesses can encounter with their social media profiles.

1. Human Error

Whether it’s an accidental tweet, falling for a phishing link, or coming off rude to a customer, employee conduct on these social platforms can pose a significant risk to an organization’s reputation.

This also extends to situations concerning the individual, especially as it relates to personal accounts of an organization’s employees, where they may talk about work-related information that could lead to things like reputation damage or privacy violations.

2. Inattention & Neglect

Loosely covered under the umbrella of human error is neglect or inattention to a social media profile. If there is nobody in charge of managing your organization’s social  profiles, the accounts may be at risk of being infected by a virus – especially if that virus is one that sends spam. It could cost you followers, and otherwise lead into an adverse perception of your company’s brand.

3. Phishing Attempts

Whether it’s a fake Facebook friend or a bot on Twitter, there is always the ever-present risk of falling for phishing scams across different platforms. In this context, ‘phishing’ refers to any kind of fraudulent communication or links intended to trick people into giving up sensitive information.

Related Reading: For some examples of the unique ways phishing attempts shape around the platforms that they use as vehicles, check out our article Hook, Line, and Sinker: Phishing on Social Media.

4. Brand Impersonators

Following on the heels of phishing scams, another risk that businesses may run into on social media is that of impersonators. Seeking to capitalize on vulnerable clients and customers, some malicious entities may impersonate a well known brand to trick people into clicking bad links or handing over their passwords. Additionally, attackers may purchase website domain names that are either similar to your company’s or negative in context to it. 

Related Reading: For a case study on an example of this type of impersonation, feel free to check out our article on the Netflix Phishing Scam.  

For questions and comments on this article, please feel free to reach out to us @CentryLTD on Twitter!

 

Centry Supports the Bulgarian Presidency of the Council of the European Union!

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What is the Council of the European Union?

The Council of the European Union is one of the primary institutions of the community; together with the European Parliament, it discusses laws based on proposal from the European Commission. The Council coordinates the policies of the member states, specifically foreign policy, and security policy of the EU, and it also concludes agreements on behalf of the EU with international organizations and other countries.

The Council is comprised of one representative from each member state at the ministerial level. Each minister for a given policy area is thus a representative of their country, and they speak for it in the council. The council has ten configurations that covers all of the categories of policies of the EU.

The Presidency of the Council of the European Union is a position that functions on a rotation basis. Each member state holds the presidency for a period of six months, with the exception of the foreign affairs configuration, which is chaired by the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, Federica Mogherini.

Bulgaria’s Presidency of the Council of the EU

To ensure continuity in the Council’s work, the presidency is held by a group of three member-states for a period of 18 months, wherein they must prepare and implement a common agenda. Bulgaria is part of the Estonia-Bulgaria-Austria trio, and it has just recently assumed the presidency as of January 2018.

Our Support

Centry has an established presence in Bulgaria, with a handful of employees and an office in Sofia.

We support Finnish and other Nordic companies in expanding their business to Bulgarian markets, and vice versa. One of our areas of expertise is to facilitate companies entering new business areas, and this is just the opportunity for it!

We are honored to be able to have a close partnership with the Bulgarian Embassy to Finland, and it has been our privilege to give our support to the Bulgarian Presidency of the Council of the EU!

For any questions or comments, feel free to contact us on any of our social media platforms!

 

Out-think Fraudsters!

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Centry Ltd. will be participating in The Institute of Internal Auditors Finland (IIA Finland) fraud training workshop! Join us to learn about effective desktop investigation procedures, and how this can boost security for your organization.

Important Details

When

This workshop will take place on March 8, 2018 from 8:30am to 4:00pm.

Where

Radisson Blu Royal

Runeberginkatu 2

00100 Helsinki, Finland

Ticket Prices

Members

580€ + VAT*

*Discount offered for one or more members of the same organization at 400€ + VAT per person!

Guests

730€ + VAT

The Program

Over the course of this workshop, you will learn methods for Investigative Desktop Research (‘IDR’), which is the process of collecting readily available public information and analyzing it for signs of fraud, corruption, or other unethical business behaviours.

This workshop will be conducted in a hands-on style, to help you learn the best that you can of how to identify, collect, and analyze information from external and internal sources for your own research.

IDR is a useful tool for assessing the nature of red flags, whilst using a small amount of resources, time, and budget. With information readily available, we will teach you where to look, and how to interpret the things you find.

Here’s what you can expect from spending the day with us, as represented in English by Oskar Savolainen of Centry Ltd! Other speakers will include industry experts Veronica Morino and Nigel Iyer, both with over twenty years of experience with IDR.

Working with us, you will:

  • Gain an understanding of the risks, costs, and effects of fraud and corruption.
  • Come to appreciate the power of detection and analytical techniques to be applied to red flags.
  • Learn to sort, interpret, and evaluate your findings.
  • Acquire skills for presenting your findings to management.

We look forward to seeing you there! Click here to register before February 25th, 2018!

For any questions or comments, please feel free to reach out to Centry at any of our social media platforms, where we will direct you to Oskar Savolainen and Kimmo Loukonen!