2 Years of Centry Blog!

After two years in operation, Centry Blog has been steadily reaching a wider audience and netting more and more views across Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. If you take a look in our archive, you will find all sorts of content ranging from simple guides on how to bolster personal security to full articles on issues such as counterfeiting, money laundering, data breaches and more. For all of our new followers, we warmly welcome you and invite you to learn more about who we are!

CENTRY GLOBAL is an international security solutions company that not only advises businesses on best practices in security, but also carries out the dynamic services needed to meet those goals. Our work takes us around the world – it’s more than a job; it’s a lifestyle.

Our professionals come from many different cultures and backgrounds, with a combined expertise based around security and risk management. Within our ranks, you will not only find professionals in investigative, fraud control, security and risk issues, but also experts in programming, software development, and security technology.

As a result, we use technology where it proves to be suitable tool, but we don’t get hooked on the tools because we know that the type of security risks you face are not machine made; they are related to people. And above all, we are people persons. We are highly communicative, we like to interact and network, and we do that in many different languages across many different countries.

The facets of our core business are divided into five different streams – those being Security Risk Management, Compliance Screening & Investigations, Business Support, Cyber Security Services, and Supply Chain Security.

Our Security Risk Management program revolves around the service of a Project Security Manager, who is a highly experienced professional, usually with prior military experience, that works to secure client project sites, no matter what country they are in. Our PSMs have worked in countries such as Algeria, The Ivory Coast, Mexico, Ukraine, Iraq, Yemen, India, and more. Each of these places comes with their own unique set of risks and we always rose to the occasion.

Meanwhile, our Compliance Screening and Investigations professionals are on the frontline, protecting our clients from unknowingly engaging with shady businesses or sanctioned individuals. Our services on in this sphere range from performing background security checks for recruitment to months-long corporate investigations to private field investigations for individual persons.

Our Business Support program has two avenues: Pathfinding and Business Process Analysis. Pathfinding is an advisory and liaison service that is useful for businesses looking to expand to a new location or culturally different market. Our professionals serve as the middle-man between our clients and the new area, by conducting research on the locality and liaising with relevant officials to ensure client operations are as seamless as possible. The Business Process Analysis (BPA) is an operational review specifically designed to identify vulnerabilities associated with a process on a preventive basis. A BPA can also be used to investigate specific losses by reviewing the process where the losses originated, without creating a negative atmosphere with employees having to be involved in an internal investigation.

Our Cyber Security professionals have the singular goal to ensure that our clients’ online business assets are safe and secure. This takes a multi-faceted approach comprised of security training, a high-level business review of existing policies and procedures, a threat risk assessment, and the creation of new policies and procedures if necessary.

Finally, the stream of Supply Chain Security services work around supporting organizations that are interested in enhancing the resilience of their supply chains by applying for and remaining compliant with international certificates and authorizations, such as TAPA and AEO.

Above all, we are a united team that takes pride in providing meaningful impact on the world around us by ensuring that the people who work with us can be protected and taken care of.

If you have any questions or comments for us, please feel free to submit them on the Contact page of this website!

Cryptocurrency OneCoin revealed to be $3bn pyramid scheme

An international pyramid scheme involving the marketing of the cryptocurrency OneCoin has now been revealed. Konstantin Ignatov, his sister Ruja Ignatova and Mark Scott have been charged by the Southern District of New York (SDNY) for wire fraud conspiracy, securities fraud, and money laundering.

OneCoin is a Bulgarian-based company that was founded in 2014 and is still active today. The company’s main operations depended upon selling educational cryptocurrency trading packages to its members, who in turn receive commissions for recruiting others to purchase these packages. SDNY has identified this as a multi-level marketing structure and attributes that to the rapid growth of the OneCoin member network. The company claims to have more than 3 million members worldwide.

In a government press release, Manhattan attorney Geoffrey Berman said that the OneCoin leaders essentially created a multi-billion dollar company “based completely on lies and deceit.”

Leaders of OneCoin were furthermore alleged to have lied to investors to inflate the value of a OneCoin from approximately $0.50 to over $30.00. This was just one facet of a breadth of misinformation perpetrated by the leaders of the company, including claims about how how OneCoin cryptocurrency is mined by company servers, when in reality OneCoins are not mined with computer resources and the use of a private blockchain, which was found to be false in the investigation.

So how damaging was this scheme? The SDNY claims that between 2014-2016 alone, OneCoin was able to generate more than $3.7 billion in sales revenue and earned profits of approximately $2.6 billion. The investigation revealed that Ignatova and her co-founder created the business with the full intent of using it to defraud investors. In one email that was found between OneCoin’s co-founders, Ignatova described her exit strategy for OneCoin, which was simple to take the money and run and to blame someone else.

Konstantin Ignatov was arrested on March 6, 2019 at LAX, while his sister remains still at large. It is estimated that Ruja Ignatova could see up to 85 years in prison if she is found guilty on all accounts, as she faces five separate charges. Mark Scott was arrested in Massachusetts on Sept. 5, 2018 and faces 20 years in prison.

Many authorities across the globe have been notified of OneCoin’s fraudulent behaviours and have attempted to stop the company’s operations.

This article was written by Kristina Weber of Centry Global. For more content like this, be sure to subscribe to Centry Blog for bi-weekly articles related to the security and risk industries. Follow us on Twitter @CentryGlobal!

Tactical Catfishing

Most of us think of ‘catfishing’ in the context of someone using a fake profile, usually on some dating app, to trick unsuspecting people. Maybe they do it for manipulation and blackmailing purposes, or to scam people out of money.

Now, however, a social engineering drill conducted by the NATO Strategic Communications Centre of Exellence (NATO StratCom COE) has shown us that these catfishing tactics can be used on soldiers to glean sensitive information about things like battalion locations, troop movements, and other personal intel.

The operation used the catfishing technique to set up fake social media pages and accounts on Facebook and Instagram with the intent of fooling military personnel. This clandestine operation, designed to take place over the course of a month, was arranged by a “red team” based out of NATO’s StratCom Center of Excellence in Latvia.

The falsified Facebook pages were designed to look like pages that service members use to connect with each other – one seemed to be geared toward a large scale military exercise in Europe and a number of the group members were accounts that appeared to be real service members.

The truth was, however, these were fake accounts created by StratCom researchers to test how deeply they could influence the soldiers’ real world actions through social engineering. Using Facebook advertising to recruit members to these pages, the research group was able to permeate the ranks of NATO soldiers, using fake profiles to befriend and manipulate the soldiers into providing sensitive information about military operations and their personal lives.

The point of the exercise was to answer three questions:

  1. What kind of information can be found out about a military exercise just from open source data?
  2. What can be found out about the soldiers just from open source data?
  3. Can any of this data be used to influence the soldiers against their given orders?

Open source data relates to any information that can be found in public avenues such as social media platforms, dating profiles, public government data and more.

The researchers found that you can, indeed, find out a lot of information from open source data – and yes, the information can be used to influence members of the armed forces. The experiment emphasizes just how much personal information is ‘open season’ online, especially as our lives are increasingly impacted by our digital footprints.

Perhaps even more troubling is the fact that even those of us who are the best positioned to resist such tactics still managed to fall for them, illustrating just how easy it is for the average person with no experience with digital privacy.

Many of the details about how exactly the operation was conducted remain classified, such as precisely where it took place and who was impacted. The research group that ran the drill did so with the approval of the military, but obviously service members were not aware of what was happening.

The researchers obtained a wide range of  information from the soldiers, including things like the locations of battalions, troop movements, photographs of equipment, personal contact information, and even sensitive details about personal lives that could be used for blackmail – such as the presence of married individuals on dating sites.

Instagram in particular was found to be useful for identifying personal information related to the soldiers, while Facebook’s suggested friends feature was key in recruiting members to the fake pages.

Representatives of the NATO StratCom COE stated that the decision to launch the exercise was made in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal and Mark Zuckerberg’s appearance before U.S. Congress last year.

A quote from the report says:

“Overall, we identified a significant number of people taking part in the exercise and managed to identify all members of certain units, pinpoint the exact locations of several battalions, gain knowledge of troop movements to and from exercises, and discover the dates of active phases of the exercises.

“The level of personal information we found was very detailed and enabled us to instill undesirable behaviour during the exercise.”

Military personnel are often the target of scams like catfishing. Recently, a massive blackmailing scheme that affected more than 440 service members was uncovered in South Carolina, where a group of inmates had allegedly used fake personas on online dating services to manipulate the service members. This just goes to show that it’s not just finances at risk through catfishing, but security overall.

Facebook has taken a decidedly firm stance against the proliferation of fake pages and accounts designed to manipulate the public. The company prohibits what it calls “coordinated inauthentic behavior”, and has bolstered its safety and security team over the past year in an effort to combat phishing and other types of social scams.

But after the success of StratCom’s endeavor, it seems that Facebook’s efforts to crack down on this aren’t completely successful. Of the fake pages created, one was shut down within hours, while the others took weeks to be addressed after being reported. Some of the fake profiles still remain.

One thing to keep in mind is just how small-scale this experiment was in relation to the massive yield of information. Three fake pages and five profiles were all it took to identify more than 150 soldiers and obtain all of that sensitive information. This is tiny in comparison to the coordinated efforts of bad actors that utilize hundreds of accounts, profiles, and pages. One can imagine just how much data could be obtained through those schemes.

As a result of the study, the researchers suggested some changes Facebook could make to help prevent malign operations of a similar nature. For example, if the company established tighter controls over the Suggested Friends tool, it would not be quite as easy to identify members of a given group.

Digital privacy is especially important – the picture we present of ourselves across different social media platforms can help people build a clear idea of who we are, which could, consequently, be used against us in terms of manipulation tactics and social engineering.

The use of social media to gather mission sensitive information is going to be a significant challenge for the foreseeable future. The researchers suggest that we ought to put more pressure on social media to address vulnerabilities like these that could be used in broad strokes against national security or individuals directly.

Centry Global has a service for identity verification of online profiles. If you suspect you may be at risk for being manipulated, contact us at www.datecheckonline.com!

This article was written by Kristina Weber, Content Manager of Centry Global. For more content like this, be sure to follow us on Twitter @CentryGlobal and subscribe to Centry Blog for bi-weekly updates.