Orbitz Data Breach

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If you made travel plans with Orbitz or Amex Travel between 2016 to 2017, you might want to keep a close eye on your card statements.

This week, the Expedia-owned travel planning company, Orbitz, announced that it had discovered a potential data breach that may have compromised information tied to 880,000 credit cards. Hackers may have been able to access consumer data submitted between Jan. 1, 2016 to June 22, 2016 on the company’s legacy platform.

Partner platform Amextravel.com was also affected, linked to purchases made between Jan. 1, 2016, and Dec. 22, 2017.

The compromised data includes names, dates of birth, postal and email addresses, gender, and payment card information of customers who submitted such information in those specified time periods. Orbitz stated that they do not yet have any “direct evidence” that this information was stolen, but it was certainly put at risk. The company has said that it has been notifying customers who may have been impacted by the breach, and it is offering a free year of credit monitoring to affected U.S. customers.

In a statement, Orbitz described working with a forensic investigation firm, cybersecurity experts, and law enforcement once the breach was discovered, on March 1st, in order to “eliminate and prevent unauthorized access to the platform.”

In the meantime, Orbitz has set up a website for US customers to find out more about the breach and whether their information may have been compromised. Individuals that enter their name and email address into the form requesting additional protection will be directed to a confirmation page and emailed a redemption code from orbitz@allclearid.com. Orbitz asserts that the AllClearID website will be the company’s primary platform for communication on the protective services they are offering.  

If you are worried about your information being compromised, ensure that you review payment card statements carefully and call your bank if there are any suspicious transactions. Similarly, be aware of phone calls or emails that offer identity theft protection – these may be phishing scams to steal your information while you’re vulnerable.

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